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BOOKS

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Check out the ROTG young reader Series

R. J Dyson is a husband, father, coach through Creativista Coaching, and author of several books, including Lexicon of Awesome, The Edge, Create Day Journal, and more. 

He's convinced that we’re all designed with the ability to imagine and create with purpose...

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ABOUT

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Creativity is your sweet spot. Songwriter, artist, author, you create because you feel alive with purpose when you do. But something's off. Maybe you feel like you're in a dry spell OR realize you're undisciplined with poor habits OR you've never cast a vision and are wondering if now is a good time? Now is a great time! How many more days, months, years are you willing to trudge in place? 

 

Listen, Life Coaching for Creatives is a partnership designed to help you discover, clarify and take steps on your creative journey. Together we make a plan to move from where you are to where you want to be.

rethink poverty is a small project born out of my desire as a husband, dad, and Christ-follower to push back on the poverty of heart, mind, body, and spirit infused into the world around us. I'm convinced that engaging poverty of any kind happens first by faith in Adonai, and when at all possible, around the table...one of the most sacred spaces in the life of a family.

Check out the first fruits of rethink poverty, our Family Jesus Remembrance Kit, and prepare to spend time breaking bread together as a family, on purpose.

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BLOG

  • Writer's pictureR.J Dyson

It's time to rewrite the script for the next chapter.


Most of us in the West have been trained since the early 20th century to live a victim-centric narrative. To believe someone else has the locus of control on our daily lives...which then convinces us that we're victims. Seeing victim-hood around every corner.


Victims of other's:

...decisions

...privilege

...opportunities

...businesses

...finances

...education

...heritage

...skin

...hobbies

...religion

...political persuasion

...gender

...age

...generation

...time period

...hair color


Name it and someone is a victim of it...real or imagined or simply irrelevant.


So what narrative are you living out? What victim-mindset, no matter how real, are you letting define you for the next season of life?


Q. What one thing can you do today, regardless of others 'out there,' in order to begin to rewrite your story?

  • Writer's pictureR.J Dyson

Making meaning is different than having value.


I'm convinced at what the ancient Scriptures teach about our inherent value in creation. That we're made in the image of Creator God. We, men and women, are thus inherently infused with divine value.


Dig into the ancient text and you'll no doubt find meaning or purpose. To know and be known by God. To love God and love others.


But that isn't what most people mean when asking for meaning or purpose. We should. And we do, of course. We want to know the high level purpose that gives us existential meaning. And we need it. It's foundational to building a healthy and holistic philosophy of life (something very dearly missing in education today).


But in the daily dirt of it all, meaning must become that tangible action we take each and every day to experience our value and live out that greater meaning.


In other words, we have to make meaning. We do this when we set healthy, captivating, meaning-filled goals.


It's one thing to want know we're valued and created with purpose. It's another thing to get really specific about which goals and how and when and with whom and towards what end we're going to move towards fulfilling them.


So, what meaning are you making in your value-packed, meaning-filled existence?

My oldest daughter recently decided it was time to get her sea legs on the long-board. No. Not a long surfboard but a 42" long land-board. A big old skateboard.


I had tried in the past to catch her interest in boarding. Didn't take. In fact, over time my son even lost interest. But the other day she grabbed what we call the Magic Carpet Ride (check it out here), slapped on her helmet, then went for it. My son jumped in on the action. My five-year-old even joined in with our only skateboard. Of course I had to get in on it too.


It was awesome.


It was motivation.


Motivation is often seen as a creative phantom. A ghost-like mist that floats around waiting for you catch it, be inspired, and get to work. But it doesn't have to be so mysterious.


Motive. What's your motive? It's a simple question, really. Why do you want to do that? What's your end goal? What is it that's compelling you to act?


My daughter's motive was simple. She wanted to be able to say that she could ride a long board. Maybe not the loftiest of goals, but a tangible one. And the only way for her to fulfill that goal was to get on the board.


Regardless of what motivated her, she did it. Even more, her action spurred us all on.


Q. What mysterious motivation are you waiting for? Why not shoot for the practical?


Break the end of the project down to its most basic elements and outcomes and then go for it.

Stay Updated With R.J

Thanks for joining the journey!

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