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Journey With R.J

Thanks for joining the journey!

  • R. J Dyson / Life Coach

Christmas is both a particular holiday and a vast season of joyful-awesomeness.


As a holiday it's all about the advent, the arrival of the Co-creator God-man, Jesus. As a season it's a vast, open-ended stream of cheer, kindness, service, giving, gifting, family-ing, enjoying, ho-ho-hoing and searching for that creepy elf sneaking around the house in the middle of the night.


And I totally love it all. I'm neither offended by those who don't celebrate the birth of the Savior in the way I do, nor am I offended by those who simply enjoy the jolly old elf with a belly like jelly.


I think creatives are born with this incredible platform, an internal wiring that allows us the ability to grasp the paradigm of co-existence, liberty and grace. Artists, songwriters, storytellers... we're fully aware that not everyone will understand or even agree with what we create. And so we realize that in order for a free and creative society to function and breathe and engage beyond our tribe, well, like Christmas we have to hold tight to what we believe while engaging those around us with grace and kindness and an invitation into our own world.


Q. How are you allowing the Dickens' Spirit of Christmas to impact you and your creativity this season?


Q. Who are you struggling to forgive? To show grace to? To view with fresh eyes, heart and mind for a hope-filled future for all?


Creatives, we have a renewed opportunity every single day to choose a Christmas attitude in the midst of a endlessly broken world. Are you?


Merry Christmas!


If you're seeking a fresh spiritual take on the words you speak internally that inevitably spill over onto others, check out my new book Lexicon of Awesome: A Melancholic Dad's Spiritual Journey Into a World of Better Words.

  • R. J Dyson / Life Coach

Your value, your understanding of your divine-human-worth, has to be separate from the project you're invested in right now.


I know, I know, our work, especially the work we love and are good at and receive praise for, is tied in unique and interesting ways to who we are at our core. Even work we don't particularly enjoy. Work that simply pays the bills and gets us from one week to the next, even this work is connected to our innermost being.


We're designed to work.

We feel our value when we work.

We feel productive and fruitful and active and engaged in our world in a deeper way when we work. And we really feel this tension come to life when we're unable to work.


But if we only see ourselves as valuable through the lens of current work then we're destined to see ourselves as useless, worthless and without value at some point: when we lose the job, when our project fails, when people stop cheering, when no one notices the energy we put into it, or the financial benefits change.


Whatever the case, knowing that you inherently hold value before and throughout and on the other side of any given project, job or career, well, that's vital to

  1. offering that project the committeemen it deserves.

  2. and offering those around you the healthiest version of you.

  3. and offering yourself the righteous view of both failure and success in all areas of life.

You're always worth it. That project might not be. And there's a huge difference in that reality.

  • R. J Dyson / Life Coach

Is today another day of staying the course? Or is today a day for charting a new one?


When we're healthy we're doing one or the other. And there's a difference between waiting, listening, praying, gathering data and insight before the launch of a new course, and sinking into a quagmire of pity, frustration, disappointment or envy.


At our healthiest, creatives work the plan until the plan is either completed in the celebration of achievement or mourned in the loss of a tried and fought for dream. And yes, we may experience a bit of both in a given moment.


At our best, creatives chart new courses built on the wisdom of the previous adventure, strengths and weaknesses, wins and losses, insights and impressions. Sure we might make drastic changes and chart uncharted courses for the next season, after all, wise and risk-adorned men and women have been doing this for centuries, but we do it based on truth and purpose, not at the hands of a mob-induced pressure.


Q. Is it time for a new course? OR do you really just need to commit for another week, month or season?