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You're Worth It. That Project Might Not Be.

Your value, your understanding of your divine-human-worth, has to be separate from the project you're invested in right now.


I know, I know, our work, especially the work we love and are good at and receive praise for, is tied in unique and interesting ways to who we are at our core. Even work we don't particularly enjoy. Work that simply pays the bills and gets us from one week to the next, even this work is connected to our innermost being.


We're designed to work.

We feel our value when we work.

We feel productive and fruitful and active and engaged in our world in a deeper way when we work. And we really feel this tension come to life when we're unable to work.


But if we only see ourselves as valuable through the lens of current work then we're destined to see ourselves as useless, worthless and without value at some point: when we lose the job, when our project fails, when people stop cheering, when no one notices the energy we put into it, or the financial benefits change.


Whatever the case, knowing that you inherently hold value before and throughout and on the other side of any given project, job or career, well, that's vital to

  1. offering that project the committeemen it deserves.

  2. and offering those around you the healthiest version of you.

  3. and offering yourself the righteous view of both failure and success in all areas of life.

You're always worth it. That project might not be. And there's a huge difference in that reality.

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