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  • R. J Dyson / Life Coach

What's Your Decision-Making Plan?

How do you make decisions?


So much of our daily stress arises from simply having to make large and small decisions about finances, creative pursuits, family events and what or whoever else is part of your rhythm of life.


So how do you do it? How do you make decisions? Do you have a working plug and play structure for discerning how to respond?


Below are a few of the components used not only by creatives but entrepreneurs, managers and even parents and in their decision-making processes:

  1. Give yourself a time-frame. For quick daily decisions maybe 5 - 15 minutes. For heftier, long range decisions maybe 24 - 48 hours. What works for your context?

  2. Have a clear idea / vision of the end goal (both long range and short term).

  3. Know what your current mission is to achieve your goals.

  4. What are your core values? Knowing these will offer some personal / vocational parameters when you're tempted, tired and confused.

  5. Have a go-to practical diagramming habit: pros / cons, brainstorming, priorities grid, healthy calendar etc.

  6. Invite someone into the process that knows you and your goals. Someone to bounce larger decisions off of as a listening ear, a mentor, for advice etc.

  7. A quiet space for thinking, meditating and prayer.

  8. Finally, a journal for recording your decision. Writing it down helps finalize your process and hold you accountable for moving forward with a clear mind and confidence.

What's your decision-making plan? Spend a morning writing out a draft plan and give it a try this week.


 

Need help figuring it out? Let's talk. Reach out to set up a free connect and let's see how a month in a personal Decision-Making Boot-Camp can help you create a life-long plan of action to fight stress and move forward boldly.

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